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Cause and Effect

Activists Will ‘Sue’ Monsanto in Mock Trial

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Monsanto, the U.S.-based, multinational producer of agricultural products infamous for its controversial Roundup herbicide, will be “sued” for crimes against humanity in the independent International Criminal Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, on World Food Day, October 16.

Plaintiffs include the Organic Consumers Association, International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements, Navdanya, Regeneration International, and Millions Against Monsanto, along with dozens of global food, farming and environmental justice groups.

The court, developed in 2011, will use the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights to assess damages for Monsanto’s acts against humans and the environment. The court will also attempt to reform international criminal law to include crimes against the environment, or ecocide, as a prosecutable criminal offense. It has determined that prosecuting ecocide as a criminal offense is the only way to guarantee the rights of humans to a healthy environment and the right of nature to be protected.


Source: NaturalSociety.com


This article appears in the October 2016 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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