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Talking with Your Parents about Cannabis

A Guide for Adults

Cannabis has been a hot topic for decades. Prop 215, which made use of cannabis for medicinal purposes in California legal, was passed in 1996. The camps for use tout the benefits that have been known for thousands of years. While the camps against tout the negative consequences that have been spread for the past 80 years. Separating fact from fiction can be daunting.

   Many families and caregivers are asking about cannabis for their loved ones, but know very little about its true medicinal properties or how to go about obtaining and using it. With Prop 64—which makes cannabis for recreational use legal for adults in California—coming online in 2018, it will be even more important than ever that seniors wishing to explore using cannabis medicinally are armed with accurate and responsible information.

Why Talking about Cannabis Matters

Cannabis is a natural plant remedy that has been used around the world bringing relief to humans for hundreds of conditions. In the United States, a growing number of people over 50 are thinking about exploring medicinal cannabis as an alternative option for pain, sleep, arthritis, stress, anxiety, neuropathy, fibromyalgia, cancer, end of life comfort or any other number of medical issues.

   In the late 1980s, scientists discovered the human body’s natural endocannabinoid system (ECS), a system that regulates and affects physiological processes including movement, mood, memory, appetite and pain. The ECS is what makes cannabis effective for so many conditions. The therapeutic use of cannabis is supported by 30,000 plus published studies on the ECS and more than 9,000 patient years of clinical trial data documenting successful use of cannabis for pain.

   Many seniors have either never used cannabis, or are coming back to it for the first time in 20 or more years. It’s a different world from the '40s , '50s, '60s, '70s and even '80s when our parents may have last used cannabis, if ever. Contrary to popular belief, smoking the herb, or flower as it is now commonly called, is not the only option. Today we are seeing more and more people using cannabis in ways it has been used for thousands of years before.

   The reality is that much like the population of the nation, the majority of those who use cannabis are over 50, but most are in the closet because of the stigma. It’s okay to drink alcohol or take dangerous pharmaceuticals, but as a society, there is still a very negative attitude toward cannabis. The good news is that perceptions are beginning to change. Be part of the evolution of medicinal cannabis users by taking steps to educate yourself.

Robbin Lynn, MBA, CCS, is co-founder of RX-C along with her husband, Terry, and the author of The One Minute Cannabist. To learn more about the facts and best practices for implementing medicinal cannabis in an informed, safe and effective manner, download an informative pamphlet at RX-C.com/letstalk.

 

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